Thundering Mustangs

If you want to go faster, add more horsepower.

Avidyne IFD540 vs. Garmin GTN 750

Understanding the differences between these highly capable GPS navigators.

All About Avionics: We Came, We Saw

There are seemingly few more mundane tasks than making holes, but there are as many ways to do them, as there are different sizes and shapes of holes. This month, Stein Bruch describes how to cut holes in the panel yourself, using tools you may already have around the shop.

What’s a Nice Guy Like You Doing in a Plane Like...

Making the transition from certified aircraft to Experimentals.

Shop Made Tools

If you can build an aircraft, you can easily make your own tools.

The Home Machinist

Phillips? Flat head? Double blade? Bob Fritz clears up questions you didn't even know you had about screwdrivers. When you're building a plane, the right tool for the right job (and right space) really does matter.

Getting Started on the GlaStar Project

Starting on the wings and ordering more parts.

On Safari

Builder Rick Reese applies state-of-the-art quality assurance techniques to the building of his exceptional Safari helicopter. By Mary Bernard.

Sporty’s PJ2

For a couple‭ ‬of hundred bucks‭, ‬why‭ ‬argue about whether a handheld VHF‭ ‬com radio is worth having‭? ‬Top-of-the-line tablets can cost five times...

Flight Testing

Organize your test program beforehand, and you not only maximize your use of time, but also understand your airplane far better than someone who is just running the hours off the clock.

In Case You Missed it

Free Flight

Paul Dye discusses the ins and outs of landing at night on a narrow, obscured by trees private runway.

Oh Nuts!

Well actually... "Oh nut!" What do you do when you drop a nut inside...

The Creative Homebuilder

12-volt test equipment.

Down to Earth

When it came to choosing a kit aircraft to build, columnist Amy Laboda and her husband opted for a metal design, in part because it would be resistant to destruction by lightning strike and also because fatigue is easier to detect in metal than it is in a composite plane. However, new nanotube technology, if integrated into composite construction material, could not only help identify wear problems, but also potentially heal them.