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Information for Authors

KITPLANES is the leading independent voice of kit and amateur-built aircraft construction. As such, the magazine isn’t written by professional journalists, but by actual aircraft builders and recognized experts who are active in the field.

KITPLANES accepts freelance articles on all phases of aircraft construction, from basic design, to flight trials, to construction technique in wood, metal and composite. We also review and analyze products and services related to amateur-built and kit aircraft construction.

Query First

If you have in mind an article for KITPLANES, please query us first and we’ll advise you on how to tailor the article to our editorial needs. Articles can be of any length, but the typical major feature is about 2,000 words. Articles on narrower topics, however, are often shorter. We’ll direct you on what length we need and how to focus your article. Short, focussed technical articles are always welcome.

We pay between $250 and $1000 for articles, depending on the topic and the length. We buy first world serial rights and the right to use the article on our web site and in promotional material for KITPLANES.

Flight and Kit Review

Since our readers are interested in airplanes and the kits sold to build them, we frequently publish flight reviews. In addition to the basic flight report on an aircraft, our readers need to know something about the kit and the company with which they will be investing their time and money.

Because of this, we consider airplane reports to consist of three parts: The flight review, a detailed description of the kit and a report on the company itself . The flight review should discuss flight characteristics, performance, special features—everything that pilots expect in a pilot report. As for the kit itself, tell us about materials used, the degree of finish of kit components, tools and techniques required and options such as owner assist or quick-build programs. These are things that a potential buyer might consider when shopping for an aircraft kit.

Last, because a builder is effectively married to the company that produces the kit or plans during the build phase, a brief profile and history of the company and its facilities will help buyers make decisions.

While we might like all of the coverage of an aircraft to come from one author, this is not always practical. Talk with the editor if you need a partner to write a portion of a report on a subject aircraft. We might have someone familiar with a particular company or close to the factory location that can help with coverage or assist in article preparation.

Photos and Illustrations

Aircraft building is obviously a technical process and one that benefits from good photography. We strongly encourage authors to provide these photos and we’ll need quite a few shots to pick from. You needn’t be a professional photographer to produce publishable photos for KITPLANES. All you really need is a good-quality point-and-shoot camera capable of no less than 3 to 5 megapixel minimum resolution. (No cellphone cameras, sorry.)

Photos should be the equivalent of no smaller than 5 x 7 and 300 dpi in the jpg format.

To put that in context, if your raw photo files are in the 1 to 5 MB range in the jpg format, that’s plenty for us to work with. Higher resolution and larger files are welcome.

Lighting in most shops and hangars is some combination of fluorescent and incandescent lighting. If your camera’s white balance is settable, you can use its automatic white balance setting to get the color close enough. If you’re comfortable with discrete settings, most cameras have dedicated settings for fluorescent, incandescent and daylight white balance.

Show Us Process

Because KITPLANES is a technical magazine, we want photos that show technical processes clearly, especially sequential processes. For example, we would want not just a picture of the completed countersunk rivet hole, but also the raw hole, the tool itself and the tool in action. This sequential requirement applies to all kinds of processes, from crimping a wire lug to cutting foam for composite work.

Where possible and practical, we would like to have wider, establishing shots showing a person at work and also detailed shots showing the work in progress. It’s helpful to shoot both in the vertical and horizontal format and, if practical, with subjects facing left and right. These choices improve the magazine layout immeasurably.

Although we shoot aircraft air-to-air professionally, you may find it helpful to shoot airplanes on the ground to inform your article, if such shots are needed. We’re happy to have these.

It’s best to shoot in the early morning or late afternoon to get the most pleasing light, although we realize this isn’t always possible. Try to frame the aircraft in various dramatic angles, for example low from the front or a low, three-quarter shot. (See the examples provided on the previous page.)

How many shots should you take? That depends on the subject, but for most topics, 50 to 100 frames is not too many. Even though we won’t publish that many photos, it’s helpful to have wide choice when producing the magazine.

And, of course, as with the text, if you have questions or need clarification, don’t hesitate to contact us by phone or e-mail. We’re happy to provide specific guidance to authors and photographers.

Submission Methods

For text alone, you can simply e-mail us the article draft. We prefer MS Word. We’ll evaluate it and either return it with suggestions for revisions or accept it and let you know when we plan to publish it.

If your package contains photos or drawings, plan to convey that to us via FTP or cloud server. When possible, compressing these file with Zip or Stuffit is helpful.

We’ll fill you in on those details when you’re ready to submit. You may contact the editors at any time with questions.

To download this Information for Authors in PDF, click here.

Untitled Document Homebuilder's Portal by KITPLANES
Photo by Richard VanderMeulen
I completed Sonex #1072 on August 18, 2014 and made the first flight on August 22, 2014 from Charlie Brown/Fulton County Airport in Atlanta, Georgia. The airplane now has over 150 hours on it and has made several trips from Atlanta to South Florida, the Carolinas, and to Tower, Minnesota which is just south of …
My CubCrafters EX N-96FV was finished July 30, 2016 - last weekend of AirVenture. My 87-year old Dad was the first passenger after my 40-hour fly off. He flew chase in his Cherokee for the maiden flight. It's painted in D-Day colors for my C-130 unit's 70th anniversary. 96th Airlift Squadron Flying Vikings were the …
It started with a visit with the Rutan guru Robert Harris of what was the EZ Hangar in Covington TN, now EZ Jets. I wanted to build a Long Eze but Robert suggested using current information and technology instead of 1977 when the plans came out. From then on, this airplane was not a Long …

Dynon Avionics' latest-generation SkyView integrated avionics called the SkyView HDX has a newly designed bezel and user controls for easier use while flying in turbulence, plus brighter displays and a reworked touch interface. Larry Anglisano takes a product tour of the HDX with Dynon's Michael Schoefield in this video.
At Sun 'n Fun 2016, Dynon continued to push into the world of non-certified avionics with its SkyView SE, a less expensive version of its popular SkyView EFIS system. Paul Bertorelli prepared this video report.
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At Sun 'n Fun 2016, Just Aircraft is showing off its new Titan-powered SuperSTOL XL. Harrison Smith took Paul Bertorelli for a half-day demo flight in the new airplane, and here's his video report.
Kit manufacturer Zenith Aircraft Company has released a new 360-degree VR short video to showcase its kit aircraft and to promote the rewarding hobby of kit aircraft building and flying light-sport aircraft.
Whether you are upgrading the audio system in an older LSA or experimental or building a new project, PS Engineering and Garmin have non-certified audio panels equipped with advanced features better suited for smaller cabins.
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