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UL Power Update

Prices fluctuate with euro/dollar exchange rate and are set on date of purchase.

Although we strive for 100% accuracy, we do make occasional errors. In our March 2014 issue, the table on page 27 for UL Power engines was inadvertently scrambled. We regret the mistake and have published the correct table below. We thank the many readers and UL Power who brought this error to our attention.—Ed.

Dawn Patrol

I love vintage aeroplanes and think it’s fantastic that someone is keeping that spirit alive. But the fat airfoil on the Airdrome Aeroplanes makes me cringe every time I see it. I can forgive the fact that a fuselage might be a bit wide to fit a VW engine, or that replicas of the Taube and Eindecker aren’t wing-warpers, but that glaring thick airfoil looks like a fat lip on a pretty model. I know that the period-correct airfoil had ugly pitching moment issues, and worse stall characteristics, but isn’t there a modern (safe) airfoil that looks more the part?

Airshow coverage sponsor:

I really enjoy the magazine. I think I’ve learned more from Barnaby Wainfain’s column than I did in four years of aeronautical engineering school. Keep up the great work.

Peter Kuykendall

Dick Stark Responds: Just about everywhere we go, we are made aware that our planes are not authentic. You know what? We don’t care. We’re there to have fun and spread the word that “Joe Normal” can build a real warbird (well, kinda) for the price of a decent used car. The kids we put in the planes at airshows don’t seem to care much about authenticity either; they’re just glad to get the chance to sit in an airplane their size. (F-18 and F-15 pilots get a real charge out of sitting in them, too!)

We have no intention of ever trying wing warping. And we have never considered using the narrow, thin, ultra-skinny original airfoils. As you mention—and from reports we have seen—they have absolutely horrifying flight characteristics. Remember rule one: fly safe!

Hirth Engines Stocked in USA

In the March 2014 Engine Buyer’s Guide, you mentioned that Hirth Engines are only available from Germany and take 4 to 6 weeks for delivery. This is not correct. Engines are ordered from within the USA, not Germany, and we have engines in stock in Ohio for immediate delivery.

Matt Dander
Recreational Power Engineering
U.S. Distributor, Hirth Engines
www.recpower.com

Thank you for bringing the correct information to our attention. We apologize for the error.—Ed.


Write to editorial@kitplanes.com.

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