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Barnaby Wainfan

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Barnaby Wainfan is a principal aerodynamics engineer for Northrop Grumman’s Advanced Design organization. A private pilot with single engine and glider ratings, Barnaby has been involved in the design of unconventional airplanes including canards, joined wings, flying wings and some too strange to fall into any known category.

Design Process: Landing Gear, Part 6

Last month, I ran out of space before getting to the end of our discussion of landing gear. This month, we conclude the series...

Design Process: Landing Gear, Part 5

For the past few editions of Wind Tunnel, we’ve been exploring the factors that drive the configuration and placement of landing gear. Last month...

Design Process: Landing Gear, Part 4

Last month we looked at how the static stability of the airplane when it is sitting at rest on its landing gear affects the...

Design Process: Landing Gear, Part 3

Last month we took a look at the basic characteristics of the two most common landing gear configurations: tricycle and taildragger. We will now...

Design Process: Landing Gear, Part 2

As we started to discuss last month, the landing gear is a major component of the airplane that affects the design in significant ways....

Design Process: Landing Gear

It’s time to turn our attention to a major component of the airplane—the landing gear.

Wind Tunnel

Design process-CG limits and tail size, part 2.

Wind Tunnel

Design process-tail volume. By Barnaby Wainfan.

Wind Tunnel

Design process-CG limits and tail size.

Wind Tunnel

Design process-CG loading, part 2.

In Case You Missed it

Wind Tunnel

How skin condition affects aircraft performance.

Let’s Split!

The secret behind opening the Lycoming Crankcase. By Richard Keyt.

Flight Review: Mustang II

When Don Caskey recognized that a passel of his neighbors had built and were flying Mustang IIs, he got the bug and constructed a custom-made version of his own.

The Future of Homebuilding: Avionics

I mean, how much better should avionics really get for what we use them...