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Bob Fritz

Bob Fritz
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KITPLANES readers will remember Bob Fritz (1947-2011) for his acclaimed Home Machinist series, but his accomplishments go well beyond that long-running feature. Following a stint in the U.S. Navy, Bob put his degree in mechanical engineering to use and was a tireless advocate for effective and consistent quality control. He brought that discipline to his work for KITPLANES. An avid diver and motorcyclist, Bob's love of flying was a surprise to no one.

Hell on Wheels

Despite losing the use of his legs to childhood polio, John Deneke has done what hes always done: found a way to fly, and to build. By Bob Fritz.

To Launch a Light Sport

Its 90% done with 90% to go! Bob Fritz has a flyable airplane and a semi-long list of things still left to do to improve it.

The Price of Power

More power! Bob Fritz takes a close look at what makes batteries go, what kind is best for your plane, and how to get the most out of your battery.

To Launch a Light Sport

Bob Fritz presses on! In this installment, he powers up the Grand Rapids Technologies EFIS panel, solves a curious com antenna problem, installs the Zaon PCAS, fits the door to the fuselage’s curvature, and streamlines the air flow to the oil cooler.

The Home Machinist

Phillips? Flat head? Double blade? Bob Fritz clears up questions you didn't even know you had about screwdrivers. When you're building a plane, the right tool for the right job (and right space) really does matter.

Home Machinist

Let’s take it to the edge. Where is the edge? If, up to now, all you’ve done is scribe a target and eyeball the position of the drill bit, this is for you. By Bob Fritz.

To Launch a Light Sport

Bob Fritz finds that in the midst of making progress, the build process has its own value. Here, he walks through the process of designing and installing an on-board fire extinguisher system for his Jabiru J250, and offers a few tips for locating holes and installing the wings.

The Home Machinist

If you need to send a part out to be built by a professional shop, a good drawing, well identified, is essential. The KISS principle applies, and be sure you don't request closer tolerances or more exotic materials than you really need, or it will cost you. By Bob Fritz.

Anywhere Map Travel Companion

Bob Fritz takes Anywhere Maps new PDA Travel Companion for a test ride, and discusses what features are winners and what comes up short.

To Launch a Light Sport

This month builder Bob Fritz searches for a better alternative to last-century circuit technology for his panel and finds it in a Polyfuse.