Weather to Fly and Weather On the Web

Whether you want to learn more about weather or already understand it and are looking for better pre-flight weather resources, author Bob Fritz fills you in on the latest and greatest assets on DVD and on the web.

Simulating Emergencies

Given the aviation accident statistics, its wise to stay sharp between flights, and one way to do that is to practice on a simulator. While that used to be cost prohibitive, todays simulators not only work well on your home computer, they offer homebuilt designs to fly; by Chuck Bodeen.

Down to Earth

Is the mainstream medias portrayal of aviation incidents sensationalized or on target? Turns out they are right in some aspects, but lacking in others. Either way, the aviation accident rate illustrates that there's still room for improvement; by Amy Laboda.

Light Stuff

Columnist Dave Martin flies one of the best-selling Special Light Sport Aircraft (factory-built), the Flight Design CTSW. Although he encounters a few surprises, transition training for pilots new to the design would likely alleviate such things.

What’s New

A WxWorx partner will help upgrade Nexrad, MGL Avionics Odyssey EFIS ships in the U.S., Sky-Tec offers the RX12 starter for Rotax 912/914 series engines, and TrickAir offers skis for the American Legend Aircraft Legend Cub.

Carbon Monoxide Blues

Although not a huge factor in airplane crashes, carbon monoxide poisoning does contribute to accidents each year. This is entirely avoidable with a good, functional carbon monoxide detector in the cockpit. The choices in these units have increased over the years, so now there's no excuse to do without this useful tool; by Rick Lindstrom.

Stainless Steel

Author Norm Ellis is not a particular fan of stainless-steel, even though he knows it has its place-even if that place is not in your airplane. After providing a brief history of this widely used material, he makes a case for choosing the right stock for the right project on the basis of utility rather than beauty-and he offers the stats to back up his assertions.

Dan’s World

Columnist and RV builder Dan Checkoway advocates keeping it simple so that you can actually afford to fuel and fly your homebuilt aircraft. He claims many builders buy into the hype about the latest and greatest equipment must-haves, and then complain about the price at the pump.

Light Stuff

The state of Oregon has a new law that mandates using ethanol in all auto fuel, potentially affecting thousands of pilots, especially owners of most of todays Light Sport Aircraft powered by the ubiquitous Rotax 912 engine. It may not be too late to take action against similar legislation that could be brewing in your state; by Dave Martin.

Around the Patch

Those who plan to build an aircraft from a kit would do well to visit the factory and get to know not only the owners but also the operation. So counsels Editor-in-Chief Marc Cook, whose recent visit to the RANS factory left him favorably impressed. RANS manufacturing is diversified to weather the ups and downs of the market, and the company knows what works and sticks to it.

In Case You Missed it

Roll Your Own

Although the KK-1 is scratch-built, builders Ken Scott and Ken Krueger have used all of the modern tools at their disposal to expedite the design and building process. This month, Scott discusses the more than satisfactory results of load-testing the wing and horizontal stab;

Experimotive

Jess Meyers of Belted Air Power continues to refine auto-engine conversion firewall-forward packages for homebuilt aircraft. By Rick Lindstrom.

Wind Tunnel

Thrust-line adjustment is a powerful tool for tailoring flying qualities, but it’s complicated.

Do’s and Don’ts of Aircraft Building, Part 2

Do’s and Don’ts of Aircraft Building, Part 2