Light Stuff

Bigger isn’t always better when it comes to aircraft—all that really matters is creating the flying experience you want to have. By Roy Beisswenger.

Light and Capable

There are so many ways to try to keep the weight down in a homebuilt project, but some are better than others.

Down to Earth

As environmental regulations and market pressures converge on avgas boutique industry, Amy Laboda investigates whats going on in energy research… and whats to come.

Free Flight

In a short, late-afternoon flight, Paul Dye takes on a particular Houston cloud formation and exalts in the glory of flying an airplane perfectly suited to his whims.

Around the Patch

A visit to the CubCrafters factory in a rural area of Washington state can get a guy thinking about leaving big city life behind. By Marc Cook.

Alternative Energies

Making those final connections. By Dean Sigler.

Light Stuff

Another European SLSA reaches American shores in the form of Tecnams high-wing, high-style, partially carbon-fiber Tecnam P2008. By Dave Martin.

Limitations

Clint Eastwood (as Dirty Harry) once said, "A man's got to know his limitations." I think that when it comes to building and flying...

Product Review: J.P. Instruments EDM-740

JPI is offering a new compact, capable engine monitor that is built and priced for the homebuilt market. By Marc Cook.

Down to Earth

An Alaskan cruise provides a perfect excuse to cross the country in an RV-10, from Florida to Washington, to board the ship. By Amy Laboda.

In Case You Missed it

Completions

Builders share their successes.

Rear Cockpit

Builder types II.

Gear of the Year 2007

There's always something new to be had in the field of aviation-related equipment, and this year we stay on the beaten trail and wander off of it a bit with a new EFD/MFD, a build-it-yourself headset, a readily stowable inflatable tent, a headset boom light, a digital attitude indicator, an electronic flight bag and spiffy, low-draw LED landing lights; a Staff Report.

Lancair Love Story

Few homebuilders forget the first airplane they constructed, even if they go on to do others. That was the case with Mike Maxwell, who had pretty much given up on ever seeing his Lancair 235 again. But life is nothing if not full of surprises, and Mike was in for a big one.